Podcast Ideas: What the people Want

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Postby Moshaya » Tue Aug 07, 2007 9:21 am

Thanks Tomes. This is very helpful. We will definitely be referring to your post and the others on here when planning more lessons,

Please keep it up :)
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Numbers suggestion

Postby tomest05 » Sun Aug 12, 2007 5:45 pm

Dear Ehab and Mohamed,

Another great lesson would be one dealing more in depth with numbers. I have taken Arabic classes for about 3 years, and I have noticed that many students including myself always have trouble with numbers. The concepts are not that hard, just pronunciations can be difficult to pick up.

The hardest though is getting your ear used to the different ways in Arabic that they say fractions, decimals, and percentages.

I am confused what exactly they say for something like "6/10" or "7/10"... or 1.35, 2.6 how do they say this? How would they say 1.3%?

I learned some basics but have not found a good book that explains these at all! I am curious because I listen to Arabic news reports for studying and every time they get to weather or financial reports I become completely lost usually in the numbers!

example, I thought I learned 2/3 is اثنان من ثلالثة, but some friends have told me if you look at it as .66667 then you can say something quite different involving other expressions. I mean the same is true for English, but I have no idea how to say "point 66667" or any other way.

So these more advanced numbers would be a great lesson or even a reference sheet that you could post similar to your desktop picture.

Keep up the great work, I hope we're giving you endless ideas for lessons!

Tomes
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Re: Numbers suggestion

Postby Ehab » Tue Aug 14, 2007 12:28 pm

tomest05 wrote:Dear Ehab and Mohamed,

Another great lesson would be one dealing more in depth with numbers. I have taken Arabic classes for about 3 years, and I have noticed that many students including myself always have trouble with numbers. The concepts are not that hard, just pronunciations can be difficult to pick up.

The hardest though is getting your ear used to the different ways in Arabic that they say fractions, decimals, and percentages.

I am confused what exactly they say for something like "6/10" or "7/10"... or 1.35, 2.6 how do they say this? How would they say 1.3%?

I learned some basics but have not found a good book that explains these at all! I am curious because I listen to Arabic news reports for studying and every time they get to weather or financial reports I become completely lost usually in the numbers!

example, I thought I learned 2/3 is اثنان من ثلالثة, but some friends have told me if you look at it as .66667 then you can say something quite different involving other expressions. I mean the same is true for English, but I have no idea how to say "point 66667" or any other way.

So these more advanced numbers would be a great lesson or even a reference sheet that you could post similar to your desktop picture.

Keep up the great work, I hope we're giving you endless ideas for lessons!

Tomes


Mar7aba Tomes;
Thanks for your nice comments and thanks for suggesting this topic, This subject can be an advance reference and we might record it for the advance level, however, I'll try to summarize the answer here.
There are so many books talks about numbers, but most of them cover the integers and don't go through the fractions.
I'll try to systemize the whole subjects in my own way.
First, there is an easy way to say the fractional numbers that has numerator and denominator by saying: 1/2 is wa7ed 3la ithnain, 4/7 is arba3a 3la sab3a, and 9/28 tes3a 3la thamaniah wa 3eshreen, where '3la' means OVER. so, you are saying one over two...
The other proper ways of saying the fraction are complicated. I'll classify them into two categories:
1=> 1/Y where Y is an integer from 2 till 10, i.e. 1/2, 1/3, 1/4...1/10
You can read these fractions this way:
1/2: ne9f, 1/3: tholoth, 1/4:robo3, 1/5: 7'omos, 1/6: sodos, 1/7: sobo3, 1/8: thomon, 1/9: toso3 and 1/10: 3oshor.
Now if the numerator is not one, such as 3/5 or 7/2... lets take 3/5 for instance, you just make it: three fifths (thalath a7'mas),, so all what we do is read the numerator normally (three) and make the denominator a plural of the fraction. I'll take 3/Y as an example and that will make it easier:
3/2: thalaath an9aaf, 3/4: thalaath arbaa3, 3/5: thalaath a7'maas, 3/6: thalaath asdaas, 3/7: thalaath asbaa3, 3/8: thalaath athmaan, 3/9: thalaath atsaa3 and 3/10: thalaath a3shaar.

2=> If the fraction is more compicated such as X/Y has Y that is NOT an integer from 1 till 10, i.e. 1/17, 3/65...
Then you can say it using the same system using '3la' (i.e: 7/34 is sab3ah 3la arba3ah wa thalatheen ) or you need to find the decimal number for it,, and that is the case in English as well. here is an example:

21/7 = 3.14,, let us focus on the 0.14. We say it: arba3ata 3ashar bil mi2a (أربعة عشر بالمئة) where arba3ata 3ashar is 14 and this (bil) is Bi Al, but we pronounce it (bil) which means (of) and Mi2a is 100,, so the translation is 14 of 100
To say the whole number 3.14, just add (three and) before, so the whole number is: (3 and 14 of 100) thalatha wa arba3ata 3ashara bil mi2a (ثلاثة و أربعة عشر يالمئة).
5.127 (5 and 127 of thousand): 7'amsa wa mi2a wa sab3a wa 3oshroon bil 2alf (خمسة و مئة و سبعة عشرون بالألف)
13.1 (13 and 1 of 10): thalathata 3ashar wa wa7ed bil 3ashrah (ثلاثة عشر و واحد بالعشرة)
0.3256 (3256 of 10 000) thalathat aalaaf w mi2atan wa sitta wa 7'amsoon bil 3ashar aalaaf (ثلاثة آلاف و مئتان و ستة و خمسون بالعشر آلاف)( a bit complicated )
About the percentage,, it is just (bil mi2a), such as 5% is 7'amsa bil mi2a,, or 3.6% is thalaatha wa sitta bil 3ashara bil mi2a (ثلاثة و ستة بالعشرة بالمئة) , then I'll let you think of 7.15% !!
You need to notice that there are more complexity if you try 112.65 because the integers has very complex rules,, at this level, I prefer to answer you question only, and when we go for the lesson and record it, I'll talk about those things and the casual (3ammeya) way of saying it which is a lot easier.
By the way, in Arabic, we read the numbers from left to right... BUT,,did you notice that we read the numbers 11-99 from right to left,, only 11-99!!.. think of this example : 836 is thamani mi2a wa sitta wa thalathoon (ثمان مئة و ستة و ثلاثون)
I hope I covered and answered the entire question and hopefully didn't make the things harder (as ma7ammad) claims from time to time

Good luck (7a6'an 6ayeban) and Salam
Ehab
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شكرا ج&

Postby tomest05 » Tue Aug 14, 2007 3:33 pm

w'allah!

That was seriously the most comprehensive and best explanation that I have seen on that subject. No kidding! I have spent literally hundreds of dollars on Arabic grammar, phrase, and guide books and amazingly none of them have what you explained or even really touched fractions even in advanced grammar books.

I was going through one of my other books and they seemed to use the word "faseela" to represent "dot or point" so they were saying:

hamza faseela sab4a = 5.7
does this make sense to you? It didn't explain faseela I just assumed it meant "." Is this the "aamiya" or quick way of saying it?

Like we say "five point seven" instead of "five and seven tenths"

7.15% = سبعة و خمسة عشر بالمائة بالمائة


Again thank you so much for the explanation I'm book marking it and keeping it as a reference!

Tomes
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Mundu Zaman!

Postby tomest05 » Sat Feb 28, 2009 9:30 pm

Halo Ehab and Mohamed!

Ya A9haabee, it's been a while. Fear not, with my subscription I have every single Podcast on my iTunes and also have downloaded every Audio Transcript thanks to my premium subscription. Honestly, I've spent thousands of dollars on my Arabic education and to be sincere your price is the best deal and you're still constant mentors and Arabic guides. I am thoroughly impressed. I wish that one day I can visit England again and be on the show with you guys! For now all I have is Skype.

Currently I'm working with several Arabic speaking colleagues! So it's been a blast and I always tell them certain phrases that I learned from Arabic Pod they think what you guys are a great blessing to all those willing to learn Arabic.

So, I've been sitting quietly listneing to pretty much all of your episodes, and I can't recall if some of these topics have been covered, or perhaps can be done with more depth or variety.

1.) How about a lesson on the various words for Football? My friends watch most of their matches in Arabic, and I'm trying to learn the words, but my base is zilch for sports words... like "draw", "half time", "off-sides", "penalty", "free kick", "striker", "pass", "dribble", "skills", "header". etc..! I think it would be fun! And of course words like "chant", "fans", "football hooligans", "club", "manager", etc...

2.) Maybe an advanced or Upper Intermediate lesson on "Media Arabic", numerous universities teach Media Arabic separaely from spoken Arabic, because of the various use of words strictly for media purposes. So, maybe a lesson on how to read Newspaper, or what to expect in an Arabic newspaper... less sports more religion or politics? Or vice versa compared to English or American papers.

3.) Speech giving, how about certain key openings, and greetings for either religious or secular speeches? And like connectors... "Moreover", "In addition", "I would like comment", "I agree with"... "I urge" etc...

4.) A cultural and religious lesson. I think so many people believe that Arabs are only Muslims. Maybe for all our benefits, we could learn Arabic phrases that Arabic Christians, Jews, Bahais, Druze etc.. use that differ from mainstream Islamic phrases everyone associates with Arabic.

5.) Back to Media Arabic, perhaps key phrases from TV News. Like I watch Al-Jazeera alot and the subtitles scroll, and there's always a "Mubaashir" in the upright corner.. .so things like "Exclusive", "Live" , "interview", "new ticker", "upcoming news", "Ladies and Gentlemen", "commercial", etc...

I am sure more ideas are floating in my head, but those are sticking out the most! hahaha. Well, really I must say thank you again! And I am looking forward to downloading the latest episode! And for your continuous growth in programming! I"ll be renewing my subscritpion for sure!

Cheers!

Tomes
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Re: Podcast Ideas: What the people Want

Postby Moshaya » Wed Mar 04, 2009 9:17 pm

Hay Tomes,

It’s great to hear from you and it’s also great to hear that you’re benefiting from the lessons. Please throw any constructive criticism our way as we continuously strive to improve the service. Your feedback is top notch as always. We will definitely be using your ideas in our lessons.

To be honest, it’s difficult for our team sometimes to think of ideas for lessons. I can imagine the more lessons we have the more difficult it will be as we would have covered a lot already in existing lessons. I like all your ideas and I agree that there is a misconception that Arabs are only Muslims similar to the misconception that English are only Christians etc.

Thanks for your feedback and support and be sure to come back with more ideas
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Re: Podcast Ideas: What the people Want

Postby jookieapc » Sun Mar 08, 2009 2:53 pm

Thank you Ehab and Tomes for the question and answer. I would like to hear those fractions in a lesson one day if you don't mind.

By the way "A Student Grammar of Modern Standard Arabic" by Eckehard Schulz covers fractions just as Ehab described.
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Re: Podcast Ideas: What the people Want

Postby chaz » Fri Jun 19, 2009 3:13 am

Hi Ehab and Moshaya -- I wanted to make better use of my spare time and discovered this site from ITunes. It seems like the best language learning Podcast out there.

I have downloaded and heard every beginner and lower intermediate podcast, and now am attempting the intermediate podcasts. With Ehab speaking only Arabic, I find the transition difficult. So I would like to suggest a podcast which identifies and explains grammatical terms and some of the other terms used by Ehab in the intermediates.

Keep up the great job.

Charles
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Re: Podcast Ideas: What the people Want

Postby Moshaya » Sat Jun 20, 2009 9:38 am

Chaz, thanks for your comment. We agree that leaping from lower intermediate to intermediate lessons can be a tough transition. Thanks for your suggestion, we’ll see what we can do
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Re: Podcast Ideas: What the people Want

Postby chaz » Fri Aug 14, 2009 12:40 am

Aheb and Moshya -- Thanks, I do think I hear now more usage and translation of Arabic grammatical terms in the new lower intermediates and beginner lessons. Every little bit of translation is helpful -- it gets heard over and over again. Great job, I look forward to all new lessons. -- Chaz
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Re: Podcast Ideas: What the people Want

Postby Serena12 » Mon Aug 31, 2009 6:27 pm

أهلاً

I’m a beginner learner, and I’m really enjoying the podcasts! :D I’m learning out of a textbook too, but I’m really finding that ArabicPod is more helpful for the verbal/spoken component.

I haven't listened to all of the beginner lessons yet (though I've downloaded them all!), but a few ideas for future lessons:

1. More idiomatic expressions. The two lessons done on this already were very helpful.
2. Sayings/cliches/popular similies etc. (Examples from English: "like two peas in a pod", "if it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck...", "like a fish out of water", etc.) Aside from being useful, they're lots of fun.
3. "Filler phrases" used in the spoken language used to cover inarticulateness or communicate vague ideas. (examples that exist in English: "like" - "she was like, totally crazy", "you know?" "I guess", "kind of", "you're kidding!" etc.). I don't know enough Arabic yet to know what sort of "filler phrases" exist in Arabic, but I know from learning Spanish and German that these sorts of phrases are almost never covered in textbooks!


شكراً

:D
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Re: Podcast Ideas: What the people Want

Postby laura » Tue Oct 27, 2009 2:39 pm

I have a very selfish request:

I live in Lebanon, where the city electricity shuts off and a generator takes over a few times a day. Lots of the time, the breaker for our apartment trips and we have to go down four stories to turn it back on. Our landlord has a store on the first floor, and since he's a really nice guy, he basically ordered us to just yell down to him to ask him to hit the switch for us.

So my request: how can I ask him in a funny, polite way if he minds flipping the breaker for us? Right now, it's basically something like, "Ya [his name], kiifak? Mumkin kahraba?" But I know that "mumkin" doesn't really go too far in Lebanon (even when we thank him as he comes back around the corner), and it just doesn't seem nice enough.

I guess how the sample conversation would go is something like, "Hey, do you have power?" (sometimes he doesn't, either) and then if he does and we don't, we could say, "Do you mind hitting the switch for us?" After he comes back, we usually say something about how his family's doing and do the normal how-are-you kind of stuff. Which is hilarious, because we're yelling at each other like Juliet down to Romeo in front of the whole neighborhood.

So thanks if you can make this happen, but I'll understand if it's too specific. Otherwise, I'm really appreciating the podcasts and liking the mental gymnastics required to translate them into Lebanese Arabic.
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Re: Podcast Ideas: What the people Want

Postby tommyharacho » Wed Nov 04, 2009 10:19 am

asalamualaykum,
I’m a intermediate learner, and I’m really enjoying the podcasts and finding ArabicPod very helpful in improving my spoken arabic.

a few ideas for future lessons:

1. More idiomatic expressions. The two lessons done on this already were very helpful.
2. Sayings/cliches/popular similies etc.
3. Sometimes i have to deliver lectures in the mosque, simple stuff like talking about the Greatness of Allah, the importance of A'amaal and preperation for the hereafter, talking about Eman, etc. Usually the speeches are in English but sometimes some of the Arab brothers and the new Muslim bros ask me to speak in Arabic. It'd be great if you could do a short speech on one of those topics. If you like I could send you a suggested transcript to work off.

Don't know what you guys think.
Was-salam.
p.s. Keep up the great work and please, please don't start charging for the podcasts!Allah will reward you for your efforts "Wal Akhiratoo khar roon laka minal ooolaa"
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Re: Podcast Ideas: What the people Want

Postby toasterhead » Fri Dec 18, 2009 4:09 am

I listen to al-Jazeera podcasts to practice, and I heard an interesting one recently that might make for a good lesson. In November, the show بلأ حدود (without borders?) interviewed Egyptian scientist Dr. Farouq al-Baz about the threats posed by climate change to the Nile delta and other parts of the Arab world.

Dr. al-Baz is a hero of mine - he worked on the NASA Apollo program in the 1960s helping the astronauts learn lunar geology. I know you already did an advanced lesson on global warming, but an excerpt from this interview might make for a good intermediate lesson, and it's timely with the COP15 meeting happening now.

It's also an interesting linguistic interview. Dr. al-Baz switches between MSA and Egyptian Arabic from time to time, so it might be a good introduction to some colloquial Egyptian phrases.

Thank you for all your great work!
السلام حنين عدوين.. كل على حدة
للتثاؤب فوق رصيف الضجر
- محمود درويش
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Re: Podcast Ideas: What the people Want

Postby Serena12 » Mon Jan 18, 2010 8:04 pm

Another idea: since there's now been a number of podcasts at a number of levels about doctors and those studying طب, perhaps you could do a lesson about barristers/solicitors/law students. :D Are there lawyer jokes in arabic? :?: :D
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